3304 & 3306 – Governor

This governor for the Sleeve Metering Fuel System is of the mechanical type. It works to keep the speed of the engine from changing when there is an increase or decrease in load when the engine is running with governor control shaft stationary.


GOVERNOR
39. Tachometer drive shaft. 40. Weights. 41. Pin. 42. Carrier. 43. Slot. 44. Pin.

The carrier (42) for weights (40) is held on one end of the camshaft by bolts. The tachometer drive shaft (39) is through the center of the governor parts. The shaft has a radial hole through the driven end. A pin (41) is through this hole and fits into the slot (43) in the carrier on both sides of the shaft.


GOVERNOR
10. Seat. 11. Washer. 12. Governor spring. 13. Seat. 14. Riser. 39. Tachometer drive shaft. 45. Race. 46. Bearing. 47. Race.

The weights (40) are connected to the carrier (42) by pins (41). The weights (40) and pins (41) work like bellcranks and pivots. When the camshaft and carrier (42) turn, the outer parts of the weights (40) move out from the center. The inner parts push against race (45), bearing (46), and race (47) (thrust bearing). The thrust bearing removes the turning movement but puts the thrust against the shoulder of riser (14). The riser (14) is against seat (13) which is against governor spring (12).

Governor spring (12) and washer (11) are in compression between seat (10) and seat (13). Seat (10) is held in position by lever (9) on the governor control shaft (1). There is a balance between the forces from the weights (40) and the governor spring (12) as long as the load on the engine does not change.

When there is a decrease in the load on the engine the engine starts to make an increase in speed. The weights in the governor turn faster causing the outer parts of the weights to move out farther. This puts more force against the thrust bearing. The thrust bearing pushes riser (14) which puts more compression on governor spring (12). At the same time the lower end of lever (18) is in the groove in riser (14).

The movement of riser (14) moves lever (18) to make a decrease in the amount of fuel for injection. With less fuel, the engine has a decrease in speed. The governor has this action again and again until the governor is in balance. When the governor is in balance the engine speed will be the same as it was before there was a decrease in load.

If there is an increase in the load on the engine, the engine starts to make a decrease in speed. The weights in the governor turn slower. The thrust from the weights against the riser will be less, so the spring pushes the riser to the right.

The movement of the riser (14) makes lever (18) move the fuel control shaft (21) to make an increase in the amount of fuel for injection. With more fuel, the engine runs faster. The governor has this action again and again until the governor is in balance. When the governor is in balance the engine speed is the same as it was before the engine had an increase in load.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *